Home / Frontstretch Staff (page 160)

Frontstretch Staff

Frontstretch Staff
The Frontstretch Staff is made up of a group of talented men and women spread out all over the United States and Canada. Residing in 15 states throughout the country, plus Ontario, and widely ranging in age, the staff showcases a wide variety of diverse opinions that will keep you coming back for more week in and week out.

Mirror Driving: Kasey Kahne Drinking Bud? Chicagoland A Dud? And Ginn Hits The Ground With A Thud

*It's now been six years since Chicagoland hosted its first Nextel Cup race. Are you disappointed in the progress being made as the track has aged, and should improvements be made ala Homestead and Las Vegas to make the facility more competitive?* Tommy: Heck no...looks like it's becoming a challenging track. I could care less how slick it was…it made for some interesting racing. Amy: The track itself has improved, as it basically started as a one groover. The problem is, NASCAR never needed to be adding all those cookie-cutter tracks in the first place - Chicago _and_ Kansas? Give me a break. Tony: Not sure why we had such a bad race Sunday. I thought Chicagoland was starting to get a bit better; instead, it just took a step back.

Read More »

Top Ten Ways NASCAR Could Make Chicagoland Mildly More Entertaining

10. Let Medallion Financial Corp. sponsor the race, featuring 43 selected cab drivers as the drivers while the actual drivers ride shotgun and try to give them advice. (Great for the Diversity program, too!) 9. Move the date to California Speedway so we, the fans, can hear once again just how full the stands really are and how great the shopping is under the grandstands. 8. Hold the race on the Dan Ryan Expressway during regular rush hour traffic. (We'll see just how brave NASCAR drivers really are!) 7. Feed each driver a plate of "Chicago Style" hot dogs and baked beans before the race and enhance the in-car audio for that true "Windy City" effect.

Read More »

Driver Shopping? Try Clint Bowyer On For Size

There is no secret that NASCAR is experiencing a "changing of the guard" over the past few years, as many of its popular veterans have either retired or are in the process of gradually exiting the sport. This attrition has left not only team owners scrambling to find competent replacements for the seats of their race cars, but race fans as well looking for their next favorite driver to replace an aging veteran. And in many ways, the process that fans go through in finally settling on a suitable replacement are no less complicated than what car owners are saddled with. Some might argue that picking a favorite driver is even more onerous of a decision for the fan, as owners generally only require a driver to be competent behind the wheel and project an acceptable public persona. Not so for most fan supporters, who, before pledging their personal loyalty and support, in addition to contributing probably more of their hard-earned money in accessorizing their wardrobe, cars, and den than they should, have a lengthy and very personalized set of requirements that a prospective new "favorite" driver must meet. That is as it should be, because this is not a "term of contract" agreement between the fan and their No. 1 driver…it is a longterm commitment. Perhaps Clint Bowyer, presently setting tenth in drivers points in only his second full-time season in the Nextel Cup Series, can fill the void that the recent retirement of Rusty Wallace, as well as the gradual and / or soon expected final retirements of popular veterans like Bill Elliott, Terry Labonte, Mark Martin, Ricky Rudd or Kenny Schrader have or will create for fans of those drivers.

Read More »

Who’s Hot/Who’s Not in Nextel Cup: 2007 USG Sheetrock 400 at Chicagoland

Chicago is known for football, deep dish pizza, shopping, and the Sears Tower; sadly, it's not yet known for great racing. However, there was at least one driver who didn't sleep through the Chicagoland snoozefest; that would be Tony Stewart, who celebrated the end of his 20-race winless drought with another climb up the fence. Smoke was left awake and alert after a weekend where he got a lecture from the coach about playing nice with others, and he turned that motivation into victory celebration come Sunday night. Smoke wasn't the only happy camper; Richard Childress Racing put all three of its drivers in the Top 10, while polesitter Casey Mears led the way for Hendrick Motorsports. But there were plenty of sour faces at the end of the day, too. Jimmie Johnson saw his chance at victory blow up along with his tire with 45 laps to go, and Dale Earnhardt, Jr. had to muscle home his Chevy to a 19th place finish with no power steering. So,what mood did _your_ favorite driver leave off heading towards the final off week of the season? Read this week's Who's Hot and Who's Not to find out if he made the cut.

Read More »

Numbers Game: 2007 USG Sheetrock 400 at Chicagoland

*1st* Fence climb after a Cup victory in 2007 for Tony Stewart on Sunday. *1.727* Tony Stewart's margin of victory over Matt Kenseth at Chicagoland. (in seconds) *2 hours, 58 minutes, 59 seconds* Time it took to complete the USG Sheetrock 400. *3* Career Cup poles for Casey Mears in 163 starts.

Read More »

Ten Points to Ponder After the 2007 USG Sheetrock 400 at Chicagoland

*1. They call it "cookie cutter" for a reason* - Sorry guys, but that just wasn't a very exciting race. Stewart got out front with a fuel-only pit stop and was never challenged in the closing laps after holding off a single pass attempt by Kenseth. There were several long green flag runs and not a lot of lead changes, unless you count the ones achieved through pit cycles, and most of the attrition was due to single car incidents. The only good news to report: the race didn't last that long. *2. He took the words right outta my mouth* - Tony Stewart said that team owner Joe Gibbs had to break away from his vacation to referee the feud between Stewart and teammate Denny Hamlin. Tony described it as Gibbs "coming to babysit his two kids." Hey, that's just what I was thinking. Of course, Stewart is ten years older than Hamlin and, as the senior driver at JGR, shouldn't really need a babysitter - should he? But wouldn't you have loved to be a fly on the wall in that meeting? Like always, Tony's keeping it interesting.

Read More »

Bubble Breakdown: Little Change in Top 35 Picture as Gap Widens to 225 Points

With the Daytona debacle now in the rearview mirror, the battle for the Top 35 in car owner points continued this week in Chicagoland; but after an uneventful day for the majority of the cars on the bubble, little changed as far as positions go. In fact, the gap between 35th and 36th place is now the widest the margin has been all season long. For more on what happened with those teams on the bubble this weekend at Chicagoland, as well as an update on the potential changes to the Top 35 rule next season, check out this week's edition of the Bubble Breakdown: *Biggest Mover(s)* The Wood Brothers decision to put *Bill Elliott* in the No. 21 car in an effort to propel the team into the Top 35 in owner points has paid dividends so far.

Read More »

Brad Keselowski, JR Motorsports May Be Perfect Match

Every once in a while in racing you see that perfect match - a struggling driver or team turning the corner when surrounded by the right people. Teams often swap crew chiefs within its own organization in an effort to jumpstart poor performance, but beginning this week at Chicagoland, it will be both a young driver and a struggling race team depending on each other to live up to their respective expectations in the Busch Series.

Read More »

Rest Assured, With 10 to Go, Teammates Know How You Make Your Bed!

Revealing what just may be the most profound look yet into the psyche of the mysterious enigma known as the Busch Brothers, big brother Kurt offered this bit of advice to his younger sibling after last Saturday's Pepsi 400 in Daytona. "For Kyle, the advice I would give is to understand that you're out there working as an individual," he said. "Hendrick is fielding your cars. There's not much you can do to help the other guys so therefore there's not much you should do to expect help from the other guys." That little bit of family wisdom was handed down on the heels of Kyle Busch's bitter defeat by .005 seconds to Jamie McMurray, a loss that ended with Busch none too happy about the way in which he was "pushed" to the finish line by his own organization.

Read More »