Articles

Blew By You: Kurt Busch Making A Case For Legitimate Title Contender… Turning Bud Fans Blue In The Process

With only three races remaining before the 2007 Chase for the Championship begins, the question of who will be the final qualifier for the 10-race playoff became a little more clear on a foggy and soggy Tuesday afternoon in Brooklyn, Michigan. For the second time in three races, Kurt Busch drove the No. 2 Miller Lite Dodge Charger to Victory Lane, in a performance that, while not nearly as dominating as his win two weeks earlier at Pocono, was convincing nonetheless that a playoff push has come ever closer to paying off.

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That’s History Profile: Benny Parsons

Benny Parsons was born in Ellerbe, N.C., on July 12th, 1941 - a small town just north of Rockingham. After growing up in the South throughout his childhood, Parsons actually made his first career choice around a profession that had nothing to do with racing - but driving an automobile nonetheless. Making a move up north to Detroit in 1960, Parsons relocated to where his father ran a taxi cab garage. That's where the youngster spent the remainder of his young adult years... learning how to drive not through the local dirt track, but by dropping passenger after passenger off at their destination as a cab driver.

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Voice of Vito: Kyle Busch Giving 110% for a Great Opportunity… And Other Favorite Cliches

In recent years, however, as the "sport" has grown, a new term has emerged to describe our beloved pastime: "business". As unsavory as that might sound, racing exists because of sponsors, and our favorite drivers and car manufacturers are indeed pitchmen and very loud, very fast billboards. With this "business" aspect comes some of the cliches that accompany corporate America as well. I was reminded of this a number of times during Kyle Busch's announcement that he will join Joe Gibbs Racing in 2008, as driver of the No. 18 machines fielded by Coach Gibbs and Co.

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That’s History Profile: Tim Richmond

Tim Richmond came into NASCAR reminiscent of the way so many do today. He got his start in open wheel racing by testing a sprint car for a friend and wound up turning laps faster than the regular driver. At the age of 21, that brief test had him hooked and soon after he won the USAC Rookie of the Year in 1978. Two years later he moved to big-time open-wheel racing, competing in the Indianapolis 500 in 1980, finishing ninth after running out of fuel. Driving for car owner DK Ulrich, he would make his NASCAR debut at Pocono later that year -- a track where some of his most memorable, yet heartbreaking memories would be made.

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Voice of Vito: Pat Tryson The Right Man At The Right Time For Kurt Busch

"Pat, buddy, where have you been all my life?!" No, that wasn't Kurt Busch speaking to new crew chief Pat Tryson following their Sunday victory at Pocono... although it easily could have been. Instead, it was Busch's former Roush Racing teammate Mark Martin, words spoken following Martin and Tryson's first race together at Phoenix in 2003. The joy expressed from that fateful day proved a telling insight into what would be a successful future between the two men... a future that Tryson appears ready to relive through the potential of a younger, rising talent.

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That’s History Profile: Junior Johnson

Robert Glen Johnson, Junior was born June 28th, 1931 in the tiny burg of Ingle Hollow, N.C. Like many of his day from the region, Junior dabbled in the production of grain alcohol corn whiskey; known far and wide as Moonshine. The Johnson family produced the stuff for consumption as well as distribution, and the latter would land him in trouble with the U.S. Government in 1956. He would spend nearly a year in an Ohio federal prison prior to his release in the fall of 1957. Although he was never caught "ridin' dirty," he was captured by his father's still after a foot pursuit through the wilderness of Wilkes County, what was to bootlegging then what Charlotte is to NASCAR today.

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Voice of Vito: The Chase For The Cup – Saving Fans From A Championship Already Decided

This year, the Chase looks to provide some excitement again to what otherwise would be a comatose-inducing runaway by points leader Jeff Gordon. Under the old system, his fifth championship would all but be decided at this point, as long as he could just avoid accidents and injury. Even during crew chief Steve Letarte's four-week suspension for rules infractions at Sonoma (with two more still to go), Gordon's come up with an eye-popping average finish of 5.2. Currently enjoying a 371-point lead over Denny Hamlin, the No. 24 team has entered into a time zone all their own; and did I mention that total doesn't include the 100 points Gordon was docked for the fender issue at Sonoma?

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Voice of Vito: NASCAR Still Showing What’s Right With Sports

Coupled with the debacle that the Tour de France has degenerated into since Lance Armstrong hung up his Huffy, the worst and lowest rated NBA Finals in history, a lackluster Super Bowl, and the NHL barely keeping it's head above water, it is times like these we thank NASCAR for being part of the national consciousness, and showing once again what is right with sports.

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That’s History Profile: Darrell Waltrip

Waltrip won his first race in 1975 at Nashville, Tenn. and he won again later that year at the Richmond Fairgrounds. This was back during the "big car" era. With all the aerodynamics of a sofa on tap and no power steering, the control truly was in the driver's hands. During this time when he started racing, he would tally 27 wins. Some of those wins came as an owner AND a driver. All of them came against four of the top seven drivers in the all-time wins column.

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Voice of Vito: Turn That Frown Upside Down, DEI/Ginn Merger Has Upside All Around

Last week, the circle-track world was up in arms about the goings-on at Ginn Racing. The former MB2 Motorsports team that shocked the world and showed so much promise by nearly winning the Daytona 500 in February, then going on to lead the points earlier in the year, was suddenly in dire straits. After dismissing long-time veterans and fan-friendly drivers Sterling Marlin and Joe Nemechek due to lack of sponsorship dollars, Ginn found himself having to go on Sirius NASCAR Radio to explain himself. It was a bit of damage control, with Ginn not wanting to appear to be this era's JD Stacy (unscrupulous early 1980s car owner), after being touted as potentially the next Rick Hendrick of the sport.

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