Recent Posts

David Starr Diary: 22 Down, 3 to Go!

It's hard to believe there are only three more races until the end of the season. We haven't won a race yet, but we have made it into the top 10 in points which is a big accomplishment for our team. We are now 9th in points, and I have to say I am surprised. We haven't had the season I had hoped we'd have, because it's been a very competitive series once again. I'm definitely disappointed in our results because I know we are better than that, we just haven't had the finishes that we are capable of. We aren't satisfied just making it into the top 10. As always, we are going to keep fighting for the last three races and try to move up in points and get that win. The whole International MaxxForce Diesel team is excited about it, and if we can keep that enthusiasm and run up front, the points will take care of themselves.

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Tearing Apart the Trucks : Wyler and Gaughan Join Forces

It's no secret it takes money to succeed in NASCAR. Typically a larger team with more resources at hand has more success than a small team. Perhaps that's why Craftsman Truck Series owners Jeff Wyler and Michael Gaughan have joined forces. Earlier this week, the two announced the formation of Wyler-Gaughan Racing, which will field two full-time truck teams in 2008. The team will attempt to qualify for at least six Sprint Cup races as well.

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A Racer and A Gentleman: Ned Jarrett

Ned Jarrett was one of the first bonafide superstars of the sport, helping to bring NASCAR to the next level in the early to mid-1960's. What started out as a regional sport with an underground following began to rise to national prominence by the mid-1950's, with factory involvement from Ford and Chrysler. At the time, the heroes of the sport were characters that seemed right out of central casting from Dukes Of Hazzard: Curtis Turner, Fireball Roberts, Joe Weatherly, and the Flock brothers. Ned Jarrett was the antithesis of the hell raisers of the early years. He was a family man who truly earned the nickname, "Gentleman Ned."

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Sunoco Misses Yet Another Advertising Bonanza

Remember way back in February, when Kevin Harvick was firmly ranked first in the Chase after winning the Daytona 500? Remember all the hoopla by racing pundits everywhere about how Kevin had the Chase all but sewn up? Me, neither! What I _do_ remember, though, is all the whining by Sunoco, The Official Fuel Supplier of NASCAR, that the Shell emblem on Harvick's car was _way_ too big, and that it was unfair because … because … oh yes, because the Shell car won and the emblem was too big. You see, Sunoco, The Official Fuel Supplier of NASCAR, had paid millions of dollars to be The Official Fuel Supplier of NASCAR, and they felt it just wasn't right that the car sponsored by a competitor twice as big as themselves won the Daytona 500 … or some such drivel.

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NASCAR Stuff We Can’t Make Up

_In our newest feature, Senior Staff Writer Becca Gladden scours the NASCAR news front to bring you the week's curious, offbeat, and just plain wacky news from the intriguing world of big-time stock car racing. Trust us, folks, these stories are all true - we just couldn't make this stuff up!_ - According to an article on Adweek.com, the makers of Meaty Bones dog snacks are actively courting NASCAR dads - a demographic they define as "middle-aged, working-class men outside of urban areas who frequent car races." Nothing like a little flattery to get consumers to open their wallets. In order to attract this target audience, the company created an online game which proclaims itself "The Greatest Game in the History of Dogs. Ever." You're invited to "mark your territory" by hitting moving objects with a stream of water while missing the pop-up cats. Really.

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Fanning the Flames: It’s Time For A NASCAR Change At The Top

It's safe to say the boom is over. With NASCAR's television ratings dropping at an alarming rate (down 16.7% from Atlanta's 2007 telecast) and a half-full house at said track — _Atlanta! A cradle of stock car racing!_ — it is past time for a change at the top of the NASCAR hierarchy. As rumors continue to swirl that the board of directors could replace Brian France with his uncle Jim, the ever-dwindling masses who now only watch the final 25 laps of each week's race are optimistic that the sport's current trends come to a screeching halt. You know the issues, but I'll list them anyway: An IROC-style car that has taken all ingenuity out of the teams' hands, a pompous indifference to the sport's rich heritage, a feeder series in shambles, judgment calls made during races that seem to defy the laws of common sense… I could go on and on, but you get the idea.

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Matt McLaughlin’s Driver Handicaps : Dickies 500

*Texas "2" Driver Handicaps* *Jeff Gordon* - Quick; Jeff Gordon hasn't won at which two tracks currently on the Cup schedule? That's right...Homestead and Texas. Gordon did finish second at TMS in 2002 and has Top 10 finishes in six of his 13 Cup starts here; however, his average finish in Fort Worth remains a paltry 16th. *Jimmie Johnson* - Johnson finished second in this race last year, and prior to this Spring's race, when he crashed and finished 38th, he'd never finished worse than eleventh at the track. That's rather surprising considering that in eight Texas starts, Johnson has only led a total of three laps.

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Fantasy Picks ‘N’ Pans: Texas Edition

The long road that's been the 2007 Nextel Cup season is finally winding down to a close; and hopefully, your fantasy team is still in a position to make you care. With just three races left, the chance to move up is fading fast; just like in the real Chase, the contenders have emerged from the pretenders in most leagues. Now, the circuit heads to the self-proclaimed Great American Racetrack this weekend, traveling down to Texas for 500 miles of jockeying on SMI's mile-and-a-half facility. With its aged asphalt surface and multiple grooves, the racing should be full of twists and turns, increasing the importance for you to pick wisely at a time where any bad break could cost you the chance to win your league. Of course, luck will always play a factor to a certain extent, as Atlanta proved last weekend; we saw some dramatic damage hit the best-performing drivers late in the race, scrambling the fantasy finishing orders for many. For those playing to win from behind, at least you can look at that ending with inspiration; as long as you're within striking distance, no lead is safe heading to a track that's had plenty a yellow flag over the years. So, which drivers have what it takes to come home with the big goofy hat this weekend, and which drivers are going to be left out on the prairie? Read on in this weeks Picks 'N' Pans to find out who to put front and center at Texas - and who to leave on your bench.

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Mirror Driving : Carl Edwards vs The Media, Junior Flees Media Circus, And Dissecting The Memphis Massacre

*Clearly, the last several laps were one of the weirder Atlanta finishes in recent memory. Is there anything NASCAR should have done differently?* Tony: Nope, and they shouldn't. This stuff happens, and it's the beauty of the sport, that you can't predict finishes - at least when there is no phantom debris caution. Tom: NASCAR's made some mistakes as of late, but this one wasn't their fault. Nothing you can do about a car getting into the wall with a handful of laps to go. Mike: What could they do, Tom? That happened, then Hamlin ran out of gas. Junior broke.

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