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Tag Archives: Joey Logano

Nationwide Series Breakdown: 2010 Meijer 300

Surprise, surprise. Joey Logano won the pole. Joey Logano won Saturday night's Nationwide Series race at Kentucky. And Cup regulars finished 1-2-3, with Carl Edwards and Brad Keselowski playing bridesmaid to Logano, whose win marked the third consecutive season he's won the Kentucky NNS race from the pole dating back to his first career win. Though a few drivers were able to keep up with his No. 20 car on restarts, the long run proved to be a boon for JGR's Toyotas as Logano was uncontested coming to the checkers. Fortunately for the fans watching, both Scott Wimmer and Brendan Gaughan (who each banked top 10 finishes) were able to keep up with Sliced Bread for at least a few laps. Mike Bliss also got around the No. 20 at lap 156, but he would spin late after losing the lead, finishing 24th.

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Matt McLaughlin’s Thinkin’ Out Loud: 2008 Chevy Rock & Roll 400

*The Key Moment:* Tony Stewart ran down Jimmie Johnson with 10 laps to go, but Johnson found enough speed in the upper groove to prevail over the No. 20 car in a battle of the home improvement centers. *In a Nutshell:* Against all odds, on a nearly perfect day at a nearly perfect race track, the Cup series put on a nearly perfect race. *Dramatic Moment:* There were nearly 400 laps worth of them, with two and even occasional three-wide racing for the lead to go along with side by side racing throughout the pack. There’s no doubt that the most popular moment of the race for the fans on hand was watching Junior send Kyle Busch spinning. Junior clearly slammed on the brakes to stay off the No. 18 car but from the cheap(er) seats, it must have looked like a little payback for the Richmond Spring race. *What They’ll Be Talking About Around the Water Cooler This Week* OK, so Johnson made his point Sunday. It’s *no longer a two man race* for this year’s title. Carl Edwards and Kyle Busch are going to have to contend with Johnson as well. Oh, I know someone will say it was contractual, but it’s hard to understand why *ABC covered the IRL season finale,* bumping the delayed NASCAR race over to the ESPN outlet. Yeah, there was a good title fight in the IRL, but ratings numbers suggest the Mother Ship should have gone with the bigger event. Still, combined with an exciting F1 race Sunday morning and a thriller at Chicago with the IRL, this was a stellar -- if long -- day to be a race fan.

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Sprint Cup Rookie Report: McDowell Has Magnificent Return With Career Best Finish

*Rocky Rookie Performance / Rookie Wreck of the Race: Sam Hornish, Jr.* While Roger Penske’s current Indy Car driver, Helio Castroneves, was enjoying the fine taste of victory in Chicagoland, his former open wheeler and current stock car prospect Sam Hornish, Jr. was dealing with the bitterness of defeat. Hornish had such an awful day that I felt the need to devote both negative categories of this piece to him. The No. 77 went down a lap early, and only the competition yellow would give him a second chance to salvage a decent race. It would never happen, though, as Hornish would continue to struggle in the back of the pack -- falling a lap down again all before the 100 lap mark. On lap 201, Hornish’s day would get worse when he and the No. 1 of Martin Truex, Jr. made contact and spun coming out of Turn 4. Hornish would continue, but probably wishes he didn’t have to as the team could only muster a 38th place finish -- two laps off the pace.

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Ten Points To Ponder…After the 2008 Chevy Rock & Roll 400

*8. Busch Whacking...Junior Style* - Stock car racing's most popular driver, Dale Earnhardt, Jr. spun out the sport's most booed driver, Kyle Busch, on lap 211 while battling for the lead Sunday afternoon at Richmond. Earnhardt, Jr., who led the race five times before settling for a fourth place finish, accepted blame for the incident and explained that he drove in too deep and made contact with the 23-year-old Sprint Cup point leader. “Not on purpose, as much as I would like to take credit for it,” said Junior. When a usually amiable and mild-mannered fellow like Earnhardt, Jr. starts taking jabs at you... don’t you think you might have a problem?

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Nationwide Series Breakdown: 2008 Camping World RV Service 300

Kyle Busch won the pole for this race and led every lap, sans the few he fell behind during a cycle of green flag pit stops. By the end of the race, Busch had led 144 of 150 laps and went virtually unchallenged, scoring an easy seventh victory of the Nationwide Series season for his No. 18 team. Carl Edwards and Brian Vickers also fielded strong entries throughout the night, though neither driver had anything remotely in the same ballpark as Busch.

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Mirror Driving: Bristol Bust? Are Owners Impatient? And Was Patience Needed For Logano?

*The Sharpie 500 featured by far the fewest number of leaders (three) since the introduction of the CoT. Passing for the lead can be difficult with the new car on bigger tracks, but was that the case at Bristol… or was it just that uncompetitive at the front?* Amy: I think... it was just that uncompetitive. It was good at the back... but at the front, it was the worst Bristol race I've ever seen. Tony: Busch had them pretty much covered up front, coupled with the fact that it seemed like the top was the better groove -- making it harder to pass.

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Joey Logano – Racing’s Next Best Thing and Worst Kept Secret

With Monday’s announcement that Joey Logano will replace Tony Stewart in the No. 20 Home Depot Toyotas fielded by Joe Gibbs Racing, the biggest piece of the silly-season puzzle was put into place. Although the announcement was an all but foregone conclusion after Tony Stewart’s plans were confirmed a few weeks ago, it does give rise to some questions. After all, Logano is replacing a two-time NASCAR Sprint Cup Champion; a driver many would argue is this generation’s A.J. Foyt. Stewart is also one of the more popular and controversial figures to boot--not an easy driver to replace on many different levels. Selecting Logano as his replacement was a natural, if not logical, choice; he stands to accomplish as much, if not more, in this car than Tony Stewart has. At just 18 years of age and with limited experience, Logano is still head and shoulders above just about every driver that was still available to fill the seat, seasoned veterans included, which is why Gibbs signed him to a five-year agreement.

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Fanning the Flames: Cup Series Needs A 400-Meter Freestyle Relay Of Its Own

I find myself totally enraptured by this summer’s Games. No, NASCAR has not taken a back seat, but it is riding shotgun. And the best race I’ve seen since May occurred on Saturday evening — or Sunday morning I guess, depending on where you are and whether what you’re watching it taped-delayed or not. That Men’s 400-meter freestyle relay was freakin’ bad. I’m sure you’ve seen it by now, but the spike in blood pressure in the final 50 meters as Jason Lezak came back from certain defeat to beat Alain Bernard and his band of smack-talking, no-walking-the-walk, sissified Frenchies was the most entertainment I’d gotten out of a race — Truck races excluded — since Busch v. Junior at Richmond. Yeah, I know it sounds silly (believe me, for a guy who knows nothing about competitive swimming, it seems silly for me to even be typing this) but we could use a well-timed finish like that on the Cup circuit about now. The July Daytona race ended under caution, Chicago was, well, Chicago, Indy was a disaster, Pocono was looooooooong and Watkins Glen, while interesting, just didn’t have any true dramatic flare. Here’s to hoping Bristol, Richmond and the first Chase event in Loudon, races that comprise three of the next five, give us something to jump off the couch about because October — with Talladega, Lowe’s, Martinsville and Atlanta — seems a long way off.

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Nationwide Series Breakdown: 2008 NAPA Auto Parts 200

*In a Nutshell:* The NAPA 200 didn’t really start until Lap 8, when rains descended on the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve. But rather than postponing the event, NASCAR red-flagged the field and allowed teams to change their cars over to a rain package, putting on grooved tires and installing windshield wipers, brake lights, and defoggers. From there, it became a learning experience for most in the field, and the road ringers moved to the front -- with Marcos Ambrose putting on a clinic in wet-course driving. Ambrose led 27 consecutive laps and built an eight second lead over Max Papis, maintaining the lead even after slipping off course under green. Pit lane, however, snakebit Ambrose and the No. 59. Ambrose nearly spun in the pits while leading, and then received a speeding penalty to boot. That handed the lead to Ron Fellows, who had short-pitted earlier in the event, allowing the native Canadian to lead until the race was finally red-flagged for heavy rain and a lack of visibility. For Fellows, it was his fourth career Nationwide Series win, and the first at any level for him on the Montreal road course named after his racing hero Gilles Villeneuve. Fellow road-ringers Patrick Carpentier and Boris Said scored Top 5 finishes.

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Nationwide Series Breakdown: 2008 Missouri-Illinois Dodge Dealers 250

*In a Nutshell*: With the Sprint Cup Series taking the weekend off, many Cup stars took the opportunity to return to their old stomping grounds -- and the Nationwide Series race at Gateway International Raceway was no exception. Midwest drivers Jamie McMurray and Clint Bowyer had strong runs; but in the end, it was Carl Edwards who scored the victory, his second win in only five starts under new crew chief Drew Blickensderfer. Edwards and his trademark backflip received a raucous ovation from what he called a hometown crowd, taking his second win at Gateway in his last three starts at the track.

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